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Advantage of sexual reproduction in changing environment

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Evolutionary biologists at the University of Toronto have found that environment plays a key role in determining whether a species opts for sexual over asexual reproduction. Whatever evolutionary force maintains this mode of reproduction across such a diversity of life must be one of the most powerful and important factors in biology.

Our work suggests that spatial heterogeneity is one of these key factors. Furthermore, sexual reproduction resulted in organisms that are adept across different environments, with different characteristics and more robust genetic constitutions than their asexually-reproducing counterparts.

J Hered. May-Jun;83(3) An advantage...

In contrast, asexual reproduction yields types that are suited to only one environment," says Agrawal. They allowed populations of rotifers to evolve in habitats that were either environmentally homogeneous or heterogeneous. Over a span of more than 70 generations, the tendency for sexual reproduction persisted at much higher levels in heterogeneous habitats and declined rapidly in homogeneous environments.

Study shows value of sexual reproduction versus asexual reproduction. The findings appear in the paper "Higher rates of sex Advantage of sexual reproduction in changing environment in spatially heterogeneous environments" published October 13 in Nature.

Living organisms have good reason for engaging in sexual, rather than asexual, reproduction according to Maurine Neiman, assistant professor of biology in the UI College of Liberal Arts and Sciences and researcher in the A Yale University study suggests even the most simple of animals engage in sex.

Ana Signorovitch and colleagues have demonstrated placozoans, the simplest known free-living animals, undergo a sexual phase in their life cycle. A species of wild yeast goes through a cycle of sexual reproduction once in every 1, asexual generations, according to new research by Imperial biologists published in the PNAS journal in April.

Sexual reproduction provides a constant...

The coevolutionary struggle between a New Zealand snail and its worm parasite makes sex advantageous for the snail, whose females favor asexual reproduction in the absence of parasites, say Indiana University Bloomington A new study shows that humans and tiny aquatic animals known as rotifers have something important in common when it comes to sex. These days, mammals can use their forelimbs to swim, jump, fly, climb, dig and just about everything in between, but the question of how all that diversity evolved has Advantage of sexual reproduction in changing environment a vexing one for scientists.

His new research describes the With many disease-causing bacteria ratcheting up their shields against current drugs, new tactics are vital to protect people from treatment-resistant infections.

Evolutionary biologists have found that...

Technology first used by NASA to grow plants extra-terrestrially is fast tracking improvements in a range of crops. Scientists at John Innes Centre and the University of Queensland have improved the technique, known as speed Research by scientists at the University of Liverpool suggests that being raised communally makes mice more competitive when they're older. Please sign in to add a comment.

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Study shows value of sexual reproduction versus asexual reproduction January 21, Living organisms have good reason for engaging in sexual, rather than asexual, reproduction according to Maurine Neiman, assistant professor of biology in the UI College of Liberal Arts and Sciences and researcher in the Study models echidna Advantage of sexual reproduction in changing environment to help shed new light on mammal evolution November 17, These days, mammals can use their forelimbs to swim, jump, fly, climb, dig and just about everything in between, but the question of how all that diversity evolved has remained a vexing one for scientists.

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